A visit to India, back when travel was still allowed…

In early March, before the world went into lockdown, Colin headed out to India to give some lectures at the Indian Institute for Science (IISC) in Bengaluru, one of the most renowned scientific centres in India.  First up was the Annual Jeremy Grantham Lecture at the Divecha Centre for Climate change (http://dccc.iisc.ac.in/about_us.html). Colin has long … Continue reading A visit to India, back when travel was still allowed…

No white Christmas: Rodolfo’s adventures in Brazil

For a few weeks between December and January 2019/2020, I was in the Brazilian Semiarid (Northeastern region) to conduct research activities, which included a workshop, field visits, and meeting with partners for future collaboration planning. The workshop was on ecosystem modelling with a focus on the role of the Caatinga vegetation on regional energy and … Continue reading No white Christmas: Rodolfo’s adventures in Brazil

Using optimality hypothesis to explain plant responses to elevation – a new paper by Yunke Peng et al. published in New Phytologist

Understanding plant functions and their adaptation to environment is essential to predict plants behaviour and the resulting whole ecosystem water and carbon cycling under the future climate. Many recent studies – more than five in 2017 alone – have analysed plant trait and carbon-cycling variations along an intensively studied Peruvian Amazon-Andes elevation transect  (Fig. 1). … Continue reading Using optimality hypothesis to explain plant responses to elevation – a new paper by Yunke Peng et al. published in New Phytologist

“Historical changes in stomatal limitations on photosynthesis…” – a new paper by Aliénor Lavergne, Colin Prentice et al. published in New Phytologist

Plants open and close their stomata in response to changes in the environment, so they can absorb the CO2 they need to grow, while also avoid drying out. When CO2 inside a leaf starts to fall, stomata opens so that more CO2 can enter and be used for photosynthesis. When plants become dehydrated, stomata close … Continue reading “Historical changes in stomatal limitations on photosynthesis…” – a new paper by Aliénor Lavergne, Colin Prentice et al. published in New Phytologist

A more rigorous method for palaeoclimate reconstruction. By Mengmeng Liu

Knowledge of the past climate states is important because it can help us understand present-day problems, particularly current climate changes. Although there are no direct analogues of anthropogenic climate change in the past, the climate mechanisms are the same throughout the time1–4. However, direct measurements of climate extend back only to the 17th century5 and, … Continue reading A more rigorous method for palaeoclimate reconstruction. By Mengmeng Liu

Once upon a time in Sichuan province… —Colin’s adventures of summer 2019

In southwestern China, Sichuan province, runs the great range of the Daxue Mountains, with the tallest peak, Mount Gongga, reaching over 7,500 m a.s.l. (Fig. 1). In that mountain range, Colin and a team of scientists and students undertook a three-week long fieldwork this August. The field team consisted of Colin, Giulia Mengoli (Imperial College) … Continue reading Once upon a time in Sichuan province… —Colin’s adventures of summer 2019

Wood density under a microscope. By Kasia Ziemińska

Wood density—dry mass per fresh volume (g cm-3)—is one of the most commonly assesed trait in plant ecology and ecophysiology. It is easy to measure and it indicates the amount of carbon a plant invests in wood, which is an important component of plant carbon budget. At the same time, wood density is just one … Continue reading Wood density under a microscope. By Kasia Ziemińska

Alternative facts and carbon cycle. By Colin Prentice

In today’s issue of Science, Bastin et al. hit back at critics (no less than four technical comments and three letters published today draw attention to errors and/or omissions in their original paper!). They have, at least, withdrawn their misleading claim that tree planting is the “best solution” to climate change. They say that they … Continue reading Alternative facts and carbon cycle. By Colin Prentice

Trees will help us to fight climate change, but only if we protect them. By César Terrer

The role of trees in combating climate change has been receiving a lot of media attention lately, with the impression given that simply planting more trees is all we need to do. But it isn’t quite so straight forward. César Terrer, a former PhD student of Colin’s, has just had a paper published with Colin … Continue reading Trees will help us to fight climate change, but only if we protect them. By César Terrer

One and a half degrees of confusion. By Prof. Colin Prentice

For climate scientists and climate policy wonks, the big publishing event of 2018 was the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on “Global Warming of 1.5˚C” produced in response to the 2015 Paris Agreement [1]. At the Paris meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations … Continue reading One and a half degrees of confusion. By Prof. Colin Prentice