What role can forests play in tackling climate change? Grantham briefing paper.

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/grantham/publications/earth-and-life-sciences/what-role-can-forests-play-in-tackling-climate-change.php The UK has made a commitment to become carbon zero (i.e. to capture or remove the same amount of carbon as we emit) by 2050. Recent press coverage has led many to believe that by simply planting trees we can reach carbon-zero and solve our climate crisis. This month, Colin was co-author of a … Continue reading What role can forests play in tackling climate change? Grantham briefing paper.

The Fire Model Intercomparison Project (FireMIP): Which model is best? The results are in.

By Natalie Sanders As with Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, knowing which Fire Model to use to predict future scenarios is a complicated business. Often researchers will favour one model over another, but there is rarely a consensus as to which model is the best to use. Due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of how … Continue reading The Fire Model Intercomparison Project (FireMIP): Which model is best? The results are in.

A visit to India, back when travel was still allowed…

In early March, before the world went into lockdown, Colin headed out to India to give some lectures at the Indian Institute for Science (IISC) in Bengaluru, one of the most renowned scientific centres in India.  First up was the Annual Jeremy Grantham Lecture at the Divecha Centre for Climate change (http://dccc.iisc.ac.in/about_us.html). Colin has long … Continue reading A visit to India, back when travel was still allowed…

Soil and the economy of leaves: a new paper in New Phytologist. By Jennifer Paillassa and Colin Prentice

The importance of soil and its role in climate change has been gaining increasing attention. We rely on soil for plant growth and water regulation. Climate change, on top of other human activities including intensive land management, will undoubtedly affect how soil services function. Soil is also an important part of the global terrestrial carbon sink … Continue reading Soil and the economy of leaves: a new paper in New Phytologist. By Jennifer Paillassa and Colin Prentice

EGU 2020 – Successful and sustainable. Could virtual conferences be the future? By Natalie Sanders

The European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly held each May in Vienna is a highlight for thousands of scientists. It a chance to learn, discuss, share, network and socialise with scientists from across Europe and beyond. However, with the COVID-19 pandemic, it was not possible to hold the conference. Rather than cancel, the organisers used … Continue reading EGU 2020 – Successful and sustainable. Could virtual conferences be the future? By Natalie Sanders

New perspective paper in Nature Plants – better late than never. By Colin Prentice

Just over three years ago, a team of modellers, myself included, came together at a meeting held at IIASA (the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis) in Laxenburg, Austria (https://iiasa.ac.at/) to brainstorm new ways of modelling ecosystems. Perhaps foolishly, the team decided to write not just one, but two “perspective/review” type papers. The second of … Continue reading New perspective paper in Nature Plants – better late than never. By Colin Prentice

No white Christmas: Rodolfo’s adventures in Brazil

For a few weeks between December and January 2019/2020, I was in the Brazilian Semiarid (Northeastern region) to conduct research activities, which included a workshop, field visits, and meeting with partners for future collaboration planning. The workshop was on ecosystem modelling with a focus on the role of the Caatinga vegetation on regional energy and … Continue reading No white Christmas: Rodolfo’s adventures in Brazil

Using optimality hypothesis to explain plant responses to elevation – a new paper by Yunke Peng et al. published in New Phytologist

Understanding plant functions and their adaptation to environment is essential to predict plants behaviour and the resulting whole ecosystem water and carbon cycling under the future climate. Many recent studies – more than five in 2017 alone – have analysed plant trait and carbon-cycling variations along an intensively studied Peruvian Amazon-Andes elevation transect  (Fig. 1). … Continue reading Using optimality hypothesis to explain plant responses to elevation – a new paper by Yunke Peng et al. published in New Phytologist

“Historical changes in stomatal limitations on photosynthesis…” – a new paper by Aliénor Lavergne, Colin Prentice et al. published in New Phytologist

Plants open and close their stomata in response to changes in the environment, so they can absorb the CO2 they need to grow, while also avoid drying out. When CO2 inside a leaf starts to fall, stomata opens so that more CO2 can enter and be used for photosynthesis. When plants become dehydrated, stomata close … Continue reading “Historical changes in stomatal limitations on photosynthesis…” – a new paper by Aliénor Lavergne, Colin Prentice et al. published in New Phytologist

A more rigorous method for palaeoclimate reconstruction. By Mengmeng Liu

Knowledge of the past climate states is important because it can help us understand present-day problems, particularly current climate changes. Although there are no direct analogues of anthropogenic climate change in the past, the climate mechanisms are the same throughout the time1–4. However, direct measurements of climate extend back only to the 17th century5 and, … Continue reading A more rigorous method for palaeoclimate reconstruction. By Mengmeng Liu